St. Clair County Histories, A Consideration of Subscription Financing and Accuracy

A map found in Jenks (1912, p. 51) of Port Huron and Indian mounds found, apparently from an 1872 report by Henry Gilman

A map found in Jenks (1912, p. 51) of the Indian mounds of Port Huron, apparently based on an 1872 report by Henry Gilman/Gillman (see pages 13-19 in the Sixth Annual Report of the Trustees of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Cambridge 1873).

by Vicki Priest (c)

Today, generally speaking, history books are written by scholars and published by companies which think the book will sell enough to make a profit.  Just like any other book today, the writer and/or publisher take on all the costs (and risks) of getting the book “out there.”  In the past, however, the expense of writing and publishing a history book may have been at least partially paid for up front via “subscribers” who paid varying fees for the upcoming work.  This type of commercial history was popular in the late nineteenth to early twentieth centuries.

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Jenkinson House National Register of Historic Places Nomination Nearing Completion

Queen Anne house, Port Huron

1820 Military Street, August 2016. Jenkinson-Cady-Secory house, built ca. 1888-1889.

by Vicki Priest (c)

The Jenkinson House, or Jenkinson-Cady-Secory house in Port Huron, had been called out in Buildings of Michigan (Kathryn Bishop Eckert,1993:352): “This beautifully painted and restored house is Military Street’s largest and most ornate Queen Anne structure.”  With such an accolade coming from a former State Historic Preservation Officer, one would think that it would have been listed in the National Register of Historic Places by now, but no. However, that will soon change (“soon” by bureaucratic standards, anyway).

The Jenkinson House as shown on a post card that was mailed in 1919.

The Jenkinson House as shown on a post card that was mailed in 1919.

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